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A Red Siamese Fighting Fish in an Aquarium
A Red Siamese Fighting Fish in an Aquarium Photographic Print
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Dahlias and Goldfish
Dahlias and Goldfish Art Print
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Fiji Barrier Reef
Fiji Barrier Reef Art Print
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Cat and Fish
Cat and Fish Art Print
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Goldfish
Goldfish Art Print
Matisse, Henri
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Under The Sea
Under The Sea Art Print
Elmer, Marnie...
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Dalmation Dog Looking at Dalmation Fish
Dalmation Dog Looking at Dalmation Fish Art Print
Tcherevkoff,...
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Angelfish of the Caribbean
Angelfish of the Caribbean Art Print
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Under the Sea
Under the Sea Art Print
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Tropical Triptych II
Tropical Triptych II Art Print
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Fish Abound in a Coral Reef off the Coast of Papua New Guinea
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Dirty Fish Tank Filters Is Death For Your Fish

You may have a perpetual supply of water for your aquarium, but water by itself does not establish a healthy environment for your aquatic pets. Aquariums should mimic the natural habitat of fish, and this requires more than just a regular supply of water.

For starters, most fish require oxygen which, in a fish tank, is provided for by the inclusion of an oxygen pump. Just as important is the cleanliness of the aquarium. Water is susceptible to the accumulation of unhealthy dirt, the rise of its pH level to dangerous degrees, and the development of perilous parasites that would jeopardize the good wellbeing of your fishes.

To combat these dangers, fish tank filters are made necessary for all aquariums, regardless of their breadth and dimensions. A good filtration system is a must for a clean, healthy, and beneficial environment for aquatic creatures. Even makeshift ponds for carps, large gold fish and gator fish require filters.

Basically, there are three kinds of fish tank filters. These are mechanical, biological and chemical systems. There are distinct differences between them, and each serve a specific type of fish tank and specific species of fishes. Let's take a closer look at them.

1. Mechanical filters. These are the fish tank filters commonly available in most pet shops. They can either be under-gravel or overhead. Under-gravel filters are those that are placed beneath the pebbles or the sand at the bottom of aquariums.

These filters siphon the dirt and other unwanted materials that have accumulated in the water system. Under-gravel filters are best suited for smaller aquariums, however, like 2.5 to 10 gallon setups. These filters may not be able to handle the load of bigger fish tanks, and they could prove quite inconvenient to clean up.

Overhead filters work the same was, but they are conveniently located on top of the aquarium. Water is sucked upwards to the filter box, and thereafter passes through porous materials (usually cotton, carbon, or rocks) to separate the unwanted particles and keep the water clean.

2. Biological filters. This is the hardest biological system to achieve. It requires a direct simulation of the natural living conditions of the fishes' environment. The wastes (ammonia) of aquatic creatures in a natural environment are broken down by water vegetation, and are converted into beneficial bacteria that produce nitrates required for the fishes' sustainable wellbeing.

It goes without saying that expert knowledge is needed is establishing biological filters. Additionally, this is recommended only for very big setups, like 100 gallons and above, and outdoor habitats like ponds and the likes.

3. Chemical filters. Of the three kinds of fish tank filters, chemical filtration is the easiest to set up. All you need are activated carbon particles. This may be in the form of a box that you'd simply dip into the water, or gravel made up of these specialized carbons. Carbon is natural ammonia absorbent that would help maintain the cleanliness and good conditions of your aquarium.

Regardless of what aquarium you're keeping, a proper filtration is a necessity. It has been said that a fish tank without filters would be tantamount to a death camp for your aquatic pets. It's a rather morose analogy, but it perfectly described the high importance of a filtration system for the setup you should aim to achieve.
 

More Aquarium and Fish Tank Info:

Aquarium & Fish Supplies (home)
Cleaning a Fish Tank
Aquarium Filters
Gravel for Fish Tanks and Aquariums
Aquarium Heaters
Aquarium Lights
Fish Tank Maintenance
Fish Tank Pumps
Aquarium Screen Savers
Aquarium - Fish Tank Stands

 

 

 
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Copyright (c) 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 and beyond. Lizardz.com (Kurt Melvin). All rights reserved.

 

adventure travel | skiing | scuba | sailing | pets | rafting | kayaks | fishing | camping | biking